Intersections: Photography, History and the National Library of Australia


About

Intersections, a handsome publication grounded in stimulating scholarship, presents a fresh approach to Australian photography.

– Julie Robinson, Australian Book Review

The National Library holds more than 600 000 photographs in its Pictures Collection. This large collection of images is contemporary, diverse, exciting, historic, whimsical and unexpected, embodying the challenge and pathos of history and the extraordinary dimensions of memory.
Now, in this first representative survey of the Library’s photographic holdings, Helen Ennis introduces us to Australia from the 1840s to the present as we have never seen it before – at peace and at war, and in all of its splendour and ordinary dailiness, as seen through the cameras of Charles Bayliss, Samuel Sweet, Olive Cotton, May and Minna Moore, Peta Hill, Frank Hurley, Harold Cazneaux, Max Dupain, Philip Gostelow, Raymond de Berquelle, Wolfgang Sievers and many more.

297 x 240mm
285 pages
270 black & white and colour photographs
ISBN: 0 642 10792 0
Published by the National Library of Australia

Table of Contents

Foreword

Introduction. Speaking personally
Portfolio: Charles Nettleton
Portfolio Charles Bayliss
1. Slow time
Portfolio: Samuel Sweet
2. The peopled landscape
Portfolio: Peter Dombrovskis
Portfolio: W.H. Corkhill
3. Making history
Portfolio: Frank Hurley
4. Silent contemplation
Portfolio: Harold Cazneaux
Portfolio: Olive Cotton
5. Signs of the times
Portfolio: Max Dupain
Portfolio: Jeff Carter
Portfolio: Athol Shmith
6. Sixties split
Portfolio: Wolfgang Sievers
Portfolio: David Moore
7. Looking natural
Portfolio: Ruth Maddison
Portfolio: Suzon Fuks
Portfolio: Matthew Sleeth

Epilogue
Acknowledgments
Note on the Pictures Collection
Further reading
Glossary of Terms
Index

Reviews

Australian Book Review, issue 274, 2005 by Evelyn Juers
Delightful and Disorientating, Australian Book Review, issue 269, March 2005 by Julie Robinson

Available from

Google Books
NLA Online
Bookworm